Warming Stripes – Ed Hawkins

Warming Stripes: A representation of annual global temperatures from 1850 - 2022. Using color alone in a minimalist style climate scientist Ed Hawkins was able to intuitively convey global warming trends to the general public. The graphic has inspired many diverse applications around the world and is a powerful reminder of our climate crisis. (Ed Hawkins, National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of Reading, using Data from Berkeley Earth, NOAA, UK Met Office, MeteoSwiss, DWD, SMHI, UoR & ZAMG, CC BY 4.0 via https://showyourstripes.info/).

An enthusiastic and prolific nature photographer for over 25 years, Steve Mandel’s diverse portfolio includes astronomical imaging, wildlife photography, and the photography of microscopic marine organisms.

Steve is much more than a photographer with a camera. When he can’t find a camera that can capture the sort of imagery he believes is required to broaden our understanding of science and widen our perception, he will just BUILD it himself.

His photographs have appeared in the New York Times, Smithsonian Books, Reader’s Digest, Forbes Magazine, Sky&Telescope, Astronomy, and used by websites including NASA. Three of Steve’s images: of Japanese Macaques, Lemurs in Madagascar, and Proboscis Monkey have been given Highly Honored Awards by the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History and put on display at the Museum. He is also the recipient of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific’s International Amateur Achievement Award, and the American Astronomical Society’s Chambliss Amateur Achievement Medal.

“Death Star” Diatom – Steve Mandel

"Death Star" Diatom © 2021 Steve Mandel. These diatoms are from the ocean around Antarctica. The largest is Coscinodiscus bouvet. The stick-like spines that radiate out from the center of the diatom are Corethon pennatum. This slide was collected as part of an effort by two Ph.D. students, Allison Cusick and Martina Mascioni, who run the FjordPhyto program at Scripps Institute.

An enthusiastic and prolific nature photographer for over 25 years, Steve Mandel’s diverse portfolio includes astronomical imaging, wildlife photography, and the photography of microscopic marine organisms.

Steve is much more than a photographer with a camera. When he can’t find a camera that can capture the sort of imagery he believes is required to broaden our understanding of science and widen our perception, he will just BUILD it himself.

His photographs have appeared in the New York Times, Smithsonian Books, Reader’s Digest, Forbes Magazine, Sky&Telescope, Astronomy, and used by websites including NASA. Three of Steve’s images: of Japanese Macaques, Lemurs in Madagascar, and Proboscis Monkey have been given Highly Honored Awards by the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History and put on display at the Museum. He is also the recipient of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific’s International Amateur Achievement Award, and the American Astronomical Society’s Chambliss Amateur Achievement Medal.

Anacapa Island – Will Adler

Santa Barbara-based photographer Will Adler has an eye for creating beautiful sharp, yet disorienting images. The photographs confuse and crop reality that asks the viewer to question the truth of the photograph and consider the manipulation of lighting and perspective that photography involves. Some are absurdly deadpan, straight photographs, while others are noticeably more intricate in their staging. Adler’s collections of photos push us back and forth, in and out of reality, all with a sly wink of humor that keeps you grinning.

-Juxapoz Magazine

Morgan Maassen

spending long hot days in the Maldives is equal parts intense as it is stunning. when the sun rises at 5am and sets at 9pm, the heat kills you and even the ocean is not refreshing to swim in. at high noon, when the heat surpasses 35c and everyone hides in the shade, i find the colors to be most vibrant: the rich blues of the sea, the blinding white sand, and the lush green jungle of the islands... it takes my breath away. i love photographing there, but i won't lie... it can be more intense than idyllic.

when i was 18 and first started exploring photography, i immediately became obsessed with shooting at night. i’d explore Santa Barbara by bike, spending long sleepless nights huddling up near any body of water or clear vantage point, to then fumble with a self-timer, trying to align a composition that wasn’t blurry or under-exposed. with so much trial and error throughout the years, it has become one of my favorite methodologies to shoot… for its slow, peaceful measure and way of observing the world in minute-long intervals, breathes new awe into the most simple of moments. – Morgan Maassen

Santa Cruz Island – Will Adler

"I have been lucky enough to be going out to the Channel Islands since I was a teenager. The islands are one of my favorite places to be. They are the closest you can get to seeing what Southern California would be like with out development" - Will Adler

Santa Barbara-based photographer Will Adler has an eye for creating beautiful sharp, yet disorienting images. The photographs confuse and crop reality that asks the viewer to question the truth of the photograph and consider the manipulation of lighting and perspective that photography involves. Some are absurdly deadpan, straight photographs, while others are noticeably more intricate in their staging. Adler’s collections of photos push us back and forth, in and out of reality, all with a sly wink of humor that keeps you grinning.

-Juxapoz Magazine

The New World Order Series – Coca Cola; By ©1011

The New World Order Series – Coca Cola, March 2020; By ©1011Plastic fragments collected on the beach, Terrigal (New South Wales, Australia) By © 1011 In the spirit of Maria Sibylla Merian’s 18th century naturalistic plates, The New World Order Series is composed of drawings of fish stamped with the logos of the most polluting […]