Tag Archives: Sea Level Rise

Rising sea levels could cost the world $14 trillion a year by 2100


Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

Failure to meet the United Nations’ 2ºC warming limits will lead to sea level rise and dire global economic consequences, new research has warned.

A study found flooding from rising sea levels could cost $14 trillion worldwide annually by 2100, if the target of holding global temperatures below 2ºC above pre-industrial levels is missed…

Read Full Article; Science Daily (07-03-2018)

Coastal communities saw record number of high tide flooding days last year; NOAA (06-06-2018)

New Study Finds Sea Level Rise Accelerating; NASA (02-13-2018)
Global sea level rise is accelerating incrementally over time rather than increasing at a steady rate, as previously thought, according to a new study based on 25 years of NASA and European satellite data…

The next five years will shape sea level rise for the next 300, study says; The Washington Post (02-20-2018)
Peaking global carbon dioxide emissions as soon as possible is crucial for limiting the risks of sea-level rise, even if global warming is limited to well below 2 degrees C. A new study analyzes for the first time the sea-level legacy until 2300 within the constraints of the Paris Agreement…

Sea levels are already rising. What’s next? National Geographic (11-18-2017)
Climate change is battering coasts with storms and floods, but we still haven’t grappled with the risks of what’s to come…

Sea level rise study shows Charleston area one of the riskiest places to live in Southeast


Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

Within the next three decades, nearly 8,000 homes in Charleston County, SC, could flood at least 26 times a year if the sea level rises by 2 feet, considered by climate experts to be a worst-case scenario.

That’s according to an analysis of data released today by the Union of Concerned Scientists in a study that estimates how many properties will regularly flood along the coasts over the next century, given a range of predictions…

Read Full Article; The Post and Courrier (06-18-2018)

Sea level rise poses serious threat to Charleston; By Orrin H. Pilkey; Post And Courier (04-29-2017)
Rising seas are the first truly global environmental disaster related to climate change. Millions of people will be forced from their homes as the seas drown the atoll nations, devastate much of barrier-island and river-delta civilizations and, of course, invade the world’s coastal cities including Charleston…

Flooding from sea level rise threatens over 300,000 US coastal homes – study


Sandbagged, trashed beach at South Nags Head, N.C. in February 1987, with some evidence of bags that have been torn or ruptured and have leaked sand. The scarp under the houses indicates that storm waves are topping the bags, and buildings were damaged or lost in the end. Captions and Photo courtesy of: © Orrin Pilkey.

Excerpts;

Sea level rise driven by climate change is set to pose an existential crisis to many US coastal communities, with new research finding that as many as 311,000 homes face being flooded every two weeks within the next 30 years.

The swelling oceans are forecast repeatedly to soak coastal residences collectively worth $120bn by 2045 if greenhouse gas emissions are not severely curtailed, experts warn….

Read Full Article; Guardian UK (06-18-2018)

Coastal communities saw record number of high tide flooding days last year; NOAA (06-06-2018)
People living on the coast may see flooded sidewalks and streets more frequently this year due, in part, to El Nino conditions that are predicted to develop later this year, and from long-term sea level rise trends…

Patterns and projections of high tide flooding along the US coastline using common impact threshold; NOAA (February-2018)
For forecasting purposes to ensure public safety, NOAA has established three coastal flood severity thresholds. The thresholds are based upon water level heights empirically calibrated to NOAA tide gauge measurements from years of impact monitoring by its Weather Forecast Offices (WFO) and emergency managers…

Federal report: High-tide flooding could happen ‘every other day’ by late this century; The Washington Post (03-28-2018)

New Study Finds Sea Level Rise Accelerating; NASA (02-13-2018)
Global sea level rise is accelerating incrementally over time rather than increasing at a steady rate, as previously thought, according to a new study based on 25 years of NASA and European satellite data…

In Next Decades, Frequency of Coastal Flooding Will Double Globally; USGS (05-18-2017)
The frequency and severity of coastal flooding throughout the world will increase rapidly and eventually double in frequency over the coming decades even with only moderate amounts of sea level rise, according to a new study released in “Scientific Reports.”…

The next five years will shape sea level rise for the next 300, study says; The Washington Post (02-20-2018)
Peaking global carbon dioxide emissions as soon as possible is crucial for limiting the risks of sea-level rise, even if global warming is limited to well below 2 degrees C. A new study analyzes for the first time the sea-level legacy until 2300 within the constraints of the Paris Agreement…

Sea Level Rise Will Reshape U.S. Population In All 50 States; Yale E360 (04-19-2017)
Sea level rise could cause mass migrations that will affect not just the United States’ East Coast, but reshape communities deep in the heart of the country, according to new research…

How rising seas and coastal storms drowned the U.S. flood insurance program, Yale E360 (04-19-2017)
Sea level rise and more severe storms are overwhelming U.S. coastal communities, causing billions of dollars in damage and essentially bankrupting the federal flood insurance program. Yet rebuilding continues, despite warnings that far more properties will soon be underwater…

Sea levels are already rising. What’s next? National Geographic (11-18-2017)
Climate change is battering coasts with storms and floods, but we still haven’t grappled with the risks of what’s to come…

Coastal communities saw record number of high tide flooding days last year


Southern California. Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

By NOAA;

People living on the coast may see flooded sidewalks and streets more frequently this year due, in part, to El Nino conditions that are predicted to develop later this year, and from long-term sea level rise trends. The projected increase in high tide flooding in 2018 may be as much as 60 percent higher across U.S. coastlines as compared to typical flooding about 20 years ago, according to NOAA scientists.

These predictions are part of NOAA’s 2017 State of High Tide Flooding and 2018 Outlook, a report produced by NOAA’s Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services every year since 2014.

The report finds that during the 2017 meteorological year (May 2017-April 2018), the U.S. average number of high tide flooding days was the highest measured at 98 NOAA tide gauges. More than a quarter of the coastal locations tied or broke their individual records for high tide flood days.

The top five cities that saw the highest number of flood days across the U.S. and broke records include Boston; Atlantic City, New Jersey; Sandy Hook, New Jersey; Sabine Pass, Texas; and Galveston, Texas. These cities faced the brunt of an active nor’easter and hurricane seasons and sea level rise, which has made these and other less extreme events more impactful.

As relative sea level increases, it no longer takes a strong storm or a hurricane to cause coastal high tide flooding. High tide flooding causes frequent road closures, overwhelmed storm drains, and compromised infrastructure.

Understanding risk and flooding vulnerability in our nation’s coastal communities

The report’s authors focused on more impactful, deeper high tide flooding in some locations than in previous reports. It assesses high tide flooding based on new, national flooding thresholds released in February, which causes the number of flood days tallied in the report to be lower in some cities compared to previous years.

This does not mean there are less flooding days. The new report uses a higher threshold elevation at some locations such as Annapolis, Maryland, Washington, D.C., Wilmington, North Carolina and San Francisco, meaning water must get higher at the tide gauge before it counts as flooding. In these locations, floods with minimal above-ground infrastructure impacts are not included.

Using this new method helps establish a national coastal flooding vulnerability assessment that can help identify flooding that would typically impact infrastructure throughout a region, rather than at a single location. As they examine their risk, communities can use this information can help better mitigate and prepare for high tide flooding from long-term sea level rise.

Original Article; NOAA (06-06-2018)

Patterns and projections of high tide flooding along the US coastline using common impact threshold; NOAA (February-2018)
For forecasting purposes to ensure public safety, NOAA has established three coastal flood severity thresholds. The thresholds are based upon water level heights empirically calibrated to NOAA tide gauge measurements from years of impact monitoring by its Weather Forecast Offices (WFO) and emergency managers…

New Study Finds Sea Level Rise Accelerating; NASA (02-13-2018)
Global sea level rise is accelerating incrementally over time rather than increasing at a steady rate, as previously thought, according to a new study based on 25 years of NASA and European satellite data…

In Next Decades, Frequency of Coastal Flooding Will Double Globally; USGS (05-18-2017)
The frequency and severity of coastal flooding throughout the world will increase rapidly and eventually double in frequency over the coming decades even with only moderate amounts of sea level rise, according to a new study released in “Scientific Reports.”…

The next five years will shape sea level rise for the next 300, study says; The Washington Post (02-20-2018)
Peaking global carbon dioxide emissions as soon as possible is crucial for limiting the risks of sea-level rise, even if global warming is limited to well below 2 degrees C. A new study analyzes for the first time the sea-level legacy until 2300 within the constraints of the Paris Agreement…

Sea Level Rise Will Reshape U.S. Population In All 50 States; Yale E360 (04-19-2017)
Sea level rise could cause mass migrations that will affect not just the United States’ East Coast, but reshape communities deep in the heart of the country, according to new research…

Sea levels are already rising. What’s next? National Geographic (11-18-2017)
Climate change is battering coasts with storms and floods, but we still haven’t grappled with the risks of what’s to come…

Rate of Antarctica’s ice melting has tripled since 2012, study finds


Concave Iceberg Gerlache Strait, Antarctica. “This melting iceberg probably calved from a glacier, as evidenced by bands of dark color which are sediment the glacier picked up while moving down the steep slopes of the Antarctic Peninsula. An iceberg containing sediment will absorb heat because of less reflectivity and thus will melt faster. Global warming increases the rate of glacier calving and the overall degradation of ice sheets, and also contributes to an acceleration in the rate of sea level rise.” Captions and Photo courtesy of: © Norma J. Longo

Excerpts;

The rate at which ice is melting on Antarctica has tripled in recent years, according to a study published Wednesday in Nature. Coastal communities along the U.S. could feel the impact of a continued increase as melting ice adds to sea level rise, say experts…

Read Full Article; CBS News (06-13-2017)

Scientists lay out how to save a melting Antarctica, and the grim future if we don’t; CNN (06-13-2017)
Sea levels will rise and all coastal countries could be seriously threatened by flooding if nothing is done to stop the massive melt of sea ice in Antarctica, according to nine award-winning scientists who have spent decades studying the icy continent and the waters around it…

Our coastal cemeteries are falling into the sea; By Orrin H. Pilkey & William J. Neal


El Morro Cemetery, Puerto Rico. Photo source: ©© Kevin Baird.
“Cemeteries by the sea are silent sentinels. Like lighthouses and coastal fortifications, they bear dates of former times when they were on high and dry land…”—William J. Neal & Orrin H. Pilkey (2013-©)

Excerpts;

A cemetery is a place of respect for the dead and its location is chosen with the expectation that it will be there for generations. Cemeteries in coastal areas were not located with the expectation that they would flood or fall into the sea. But most of the world’s ocean and estuarine shorelines are eroding — some slowly like California’s rocky coasts, and others rapidly like the Carolinas’ barrier island coasts.

Coastal cemeteries around the world are in imminent danger of falling into the sea…

Read Full Article; The News & Observer (05-29-2018)

Cemeteries in the Sea; By William J. Neal & Orrin H. Pilkey; By Orrin H. Pilkey & William J. Neal (11-01-2013)

Erosion at New York’s Hart Island graveyard unearths human bones; CBS News (04-25-2018)
Hart Island, a massive burial ground near the Bronx borough of New York City, is eroding, unearthing human bones along the shoreline. Advocates said the city hasn’t done anything – until now…

Cooks government ready to deal with vulnerable cemetery, Radio NZ (02-22-2016)
The Cook Islands government says work on a retaining wall that will protect a cemetery from losing more graves to the sea is going to start immediately…

Kiwi graves disappearing off cliffs in Rarotonga ‘like no one cares’, TVNZ (02-23-2013)
A cemetery in the Pacific nation literally washing away, and the Cook Islands government is refusing to do anything about it…

Rising Seas Wash Dead Away from Marshall Islands Graves, Guardian UK (06-06-2014)

Del Mar takes another look at rising sea level and unpopular ‘planned retreat’


Photo source: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

The California Coastal Commission requires all coastal cities to have a sea-rise adaptation plan, and to include planned retreat as part of their strategy…

Read Full Article; San Diego Union Tribune (05-20-2018)

Blowing In The Wind? Spending Millions On Disappearing San Diego Beach Sand; KPBS (02-05-2016)
All up and down the San Diego coast, sand, particularly in North County, has disappeared from the beaches. A radio interview of Gary Griggs, Director, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz, on KPBS News…

The only answer to rising seas is to retreat; By Orrin H. Pilkey & Keith C. Pilkey; The News & Observer (10-18-2017)
Except for the timing, there is no controversy among scientists regarding sea level rise. Defending the coast and holding the shoreline in place ultimately will be futile. With a three-foot or a six-foot sea level rise, we will retreat, probably beginning within the next 50 years…

Republican congressman explains sea-level rise: it’s rocks falling into the sea

uk-cli
Coastal erosion, white cliffs of Dover, UK. Photo source: ©© Eugene Kaspersky

Excerpts;

In a hearing of the House Science, Space and Technology on Wednesday, a member of Congress has suggested that the White Cliffs of Dover tumbling into the English Channel was causing rising sea levels, pushing back at the notion that rising sea levels were the result of global warming…

Read Full Article; Guardian UK (05-17-2018)

Sea-level rise: the defining issue of the century; Editorial; Sun Sentinel (04-04-2018)
No graver threat faces the future of South Florida than the accelerating pace of sea-level rise. In the past century, the sea has risen 9 inches. In the past 23 years, it’s risen 3 inches. By 2060, it’s predicted to rise another 2 feet, with no sign of slowing down…

The military paid for a study on sea level rise. The results were scary; The Washington Post (04-25-2018)

Sea level rise isn’t just happening, it’s getting faster; The Washington Post (06-26-2017)
In at least the third such study published in the past year, scientists have confirmed seas are rising, and the rate of sea level rise is increasing as time passes — a sobering punchline for coastal communities that are only now beginning to prepare for a troubling future…

Rising seas could result in 2 billion refugees by 2100; Science Daily (06-26-2017)
In the year 2100, 2 billion people — about one-fifth of the world’s population — could become climate change refugees due to rising ocean levels. Those who once lived on coastlines will face displacement and resettlement bottlenecks as they seek habitable places inland, according to new research…

New Trump Administration Flood Standards Mirror Obama-Era Rules; Yale E360 (02-08-2018)

Top US firms including Walmart and Ford oppose Trump on climate change; Guardian UK (12-01-2017))
The big businesses Donald Trump claims to champion are increasingly choosing to ignore the US president’s sceptical stance on climate change and press ahead towards their own environmental goals without him.

As Trump Retreats, States Are Joining Forces on Climate Action; Yale E360 (10-09-2017)

The fight against climate change: four cities leading the way in the Trump era; Guardian UK (06-12-2017)

Climate Progress, With or Without Trump; The New York Times (03-31-2017)

Trump won’t stop Americans hitting the Paris climate targets. Here’s how we do it; Guardian UK (08-11-2017)