Sea Level Rise

Accelerated erosion

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There will always be beaches, but sea level rise will ensure that they will not be in the same place in the future. The beaches will still exist throughout this change, but many of the buildings may not. Efforts to save development, however do threaten beaches, such as shoreline armoring structures.

Although relative amounts of rise may seem very small, only a few millimeters per year, the cumulative effect of these small rises each year over a long period of time (100+ years) causes major problems. Accelerated rates of erosion are attributed to sea level rise and erosion causes large economic losses around the world each year due to the close proximity of buildings and critical infrastructure. This includes transportation systems, gas and oil lines as well as electricity lines and power plants.

Most developed coasts and beaches have buildings very close to the ocean leaving little room for the ever-expanding ocean. The future effects of sea level rise on coastal civilization over the entire world are of great concern. Over half of the world’s population lives within 100 km of the coast. Over the next 50 years, damage due to coastal development will be devastating, but if the rate of sea level rise increases, the results could be catastrophic. This issue threatens areas from New York City in the United States to the Pearl River Delta in China to the Maldives.

The world map below allows you to see elevations of coastal areas. Areas in red are the lowest in elevation and are most prone to flooding. Check out Manhattan in New York City. If you think the situation there looks dire, be sure to check out the effects of a 2 m rise in sea level on Pearl River Delta in China, home to more than 40 million people. Map courtesy of globalwarmingart.com


Surfing in / Sea Level Rise

Despite Rising Seas and Bigger Storms, Florida’s Land Rush Endures

Florida was built on the seductive delusion that a swamp is a fine place for paradise.

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NASA/UCI Find Evidence of Sea Level ‘Fingerprints’

Researchers have reported the first detection of sea level “fingerprints” in ocean observations: detectable patterns of sea level variability around the world resulting from changes in water storage on Earth’s continents and in the mass of ice sheets. Scientists had a solid understanding of the physics of sea level fingerprints, but have never had a direct detection of the phenomenon until now.

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East Coast of the USA is slowly sinking into the sea, study shows

The East Coast of the United States is threatened by more frequent flooding in the future. According to this study, the states of Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina are most at risk. Their coastal regions are being immersed by up to three millimeters per year , mong other things, due to human intervention.

Comments Off on East Coast of the USA is slowly sinking into the sea, study shows

The Next Houston

Even as Harvey lingers in the Gulf Coast, dumping rain on an already deluged region, the Atlantic hurricane season continues, and threatens to bring more nasty storms in short order. In the central Atlantic, Irma is some 3,000 miles southeast of Miami Wednesday afternoon, and is expected to become a hurricane later this week.

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Climate Refugees: Kiribati, Video

Scientists have said that the island nation, along with other low-lying Pacific nations, could be uninhabitable within decades. Sea level is rising 50 percent faster than it was 20 years ago and that is a real cause for alarm, so it is not a future thing we are really seeing that acceleration…

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On North Carolina’s Outer Banks, A Preview Of What Might Be In Store For Mass. Barrier Beaches

The first truly global disaster resulting from climate change may come from rising sea levels. It’s a problem we will share with every coastal community on every continent.

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In Egypt, A Rising Sea — And Growing Worries About Climate Change’s Effects

On Egypt’s Mediterranean coast, August should be prime tourist season. But the seaside restaurants in Alexandria are almost empty. According to the World Bank, Egypt is one of the countries that will be most vulnerable to the effects of climate change.

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Cause of Atlantic coastline’s sea level rise hot spots now revealed

Seas rose in the southeastern US between 2011 and 2015 by more than six times the global average sea level rise that is already happening due to human-induced global warming, new research shows. The combined effects of El Niño (ENSO) and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), both of which are naturally occurring climate processes, drove this recent sea level rise hot spot, according to the study.

Comments Off on Cause of Atlantic coastline’s sea level rise hot spots now revealed

No longer water under the bridge, statistics yields new data on sea levels

While the scientific community has long warned about rising sea levels and their destructive impact on some of the United States’ most populous cities, researchers have developed a new, statistical method that more precisely calculates the rate of sea level rise, showing it’s not only increasing, but accelerating.

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Recent / Sea Level Rise

Despite Rising Seas and Bigger Storms, Florida’s Land Rush Endures

September 19th, 2017

Florida was built on the seductive delusion that a swamp is a fine place for paradise.

Read More

NASA/UCI Find Evidence of Sea Level ‘Fingerprints’

September 17th, 2017

Researchers have reported the first detection of sea level “fingerprints” in ocean observations: detectable patterns of sea level variability around the world resulting from changes in water storage on Earth’s continents and in the mass of ice sheets. Scientists had a solid understanding of the physics of sea level fingerprints, but have never had a direct detection of the phenomenon until now.

Read More

East Coast of the USA is slowly sinking into the sea, study shows

September 11th, 2017

The East Coast of the United States is threatened by more frequent flooding in the future. According to this study, the states of Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina are most at risk. Their coastal regions are being immersed by up to three millimeters per year , mong other things, due to human intervention.

Read More

The Next Houston

August 31st, 2017

Even as Harvey lingers in the Gulf Coast, dumping rain on an already deluged region, the Atlantic hurricane season continues, and threatens to bring more nasty storms in short order. In the central Atlantic, Irma is some 3,000 miles southeast of Miami Wednesday afternoon, and is expected to become a hurricane later this week.

Read More

Climate Refugees: Kiribati, Video

August 27th, 2017

Scientists have said that the island nation, along with other low-lying Pacific nations, could be uninhabitable within decades. Sea level is rising 50 percent faster than it was 20 years ago and that is a real cause for alarm, so it is not a future thing we are really seeing that acceleration…

Read More

On North Carolina’s Outer Banks, A Preview Of What Might Be In Store For Mass. Barrier Beaches

August 17th, 2017

The first truly global disaster resulting from climate change may come from rising sea levels. It’s a problem we will share with every coastal community on every continent.

Read More

In Egypt, A Rising Sea — And Growing Worries About Climate Change’s Effects

August 13th, 2017

On Egypt’s Mediterranean coast, August should be prime tourist season. But the seaside restaurants in Alexandria are almost empty. According to the World Bank, Egypt is one of the countries that will be most vulnerable to the effects of climate change.

Read More

Cause of Atlantic coastline’s sea level rise hot spots now revealed

August 10th, 2017

Seas rose in the southeastern US between 2011 and 2015 by more than six times the global average sea level rise that is already happening due to human-induced global warming, new research shows. The combined effects of El Niño (ENSO) and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), both of which are naturally occurring climate processes, drove this recent sea level rise hot spot, according to the study.

Read More

No longer water under the bridge, statistics yields new data on sea levels

August 10th, 2017

While the scientific community has long warned about rising sea levels and their destructive impact on some of the United States’ most populous cities, researchers have developed a new, statistical method that more precisely calculates the rate of sea level rise, showing it’s not only increasing, but accelerating.

Read More

Higher seas to flood dozens of US cities, study says; is yours one of them?

August 1st, 2017

For the past several years, scientists have been trying to get people to wake up to the dangers that lie ahead in rising seas due to climate change. A comprehensive list now names hundreds of US cities, large and small, that may not make it through the next 20, 50 or 80 years due to sea level rise.

Read More