Category Archives: Beach Nourishment

Hawaii to Add Sand to Chronically Eroding Waikiki Beach

waikiki
View of Waikiki Beach area. Photo source: ErgoSum88

Excerpts;

A $2.3 million state project to widen a chronically eroding section of Waikiki beach with sand pumped in from offshore, will begin by the end of this month.

Waikiki naturally has a narrow beach, and people have been adding sand to the shoreline to make it wider. The earliest beach replenishment projects are believed to date to the 1920s. The first well-documented case was in 1939…

Read Full Article, AP

Sea Level Rise And The World’s Beaches, by Orrin H. Pilkey

Read About Beach-Renourishement, PSDS / Coastal Care
“If we must nourish beaches, we should use the least damaging source areas for sand and regulations/laws to that effect are needed. In addition, there is a global sand quality problem – poor quality (gravelly, muddy, shelly sand) is being pumped up on beaches. Recognition of the biological impact of placing sand on a beach is a particularly great need as beach nourishment temporarily destroys the entire nearshore marine ecosystem affecting birds, nearshore fish, and invertebrates…”

Sri Lanka Battles Sea Erosion

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Galle, Southwestern coast, Sri Lanka. Photograph: © SAF

Excerpts;

In the past, to shore up defences against sea erosion, Sri Lanka has used hard structures including rock, which disfigures beach areas and could also shift erosion to adjacent areas, by redirecting energy.

Sri Lanka’s Western Coastal areas which face strong monsoon winds have been particularly susceptible to sea erosion in the past. In many Asian nations, human activities such as destruction of mangroves for prawn culture have worsened erosion…

Read Full Article, in Dredging Today

Sea Level Rise And The World’s Beaches, by Orrin H. Pilkey

South Beach Renourishment Project Sparks Timing Debate, in Dredging Today

Read About Beach-Renourishement, PSDS / Coastal Care
“If we must nourish beaches, we should use the least damaging source areas for sand and regulations/laws to that effect are needed. In addition, there is a global sand quality problem – poor quality (gravelly, muddy, shelly sand) is being pumped up on beaches. Recognition of the biological impact of placing sand on a beach is a particularly great need as beach nourishment temporarily destroys the entire nearshore marine ecosystem affecting birds, nearshore fish, and invertebrates…”

Dutch Unveil Plan In War Against The Sea: A Sandbar

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Sand dredging off the Dutch coast. Sand is brought from a certain distance from the coast with this kind of ship. Then, it’s added to the beach or dumped in the sea very close to the coastline. Photo source: ©© Inyucho

Excerpts;

In its age-old war to keep back the sea, low-lying Netherlands has dumped sand onto a surface larger than 200 football fields just off the coast, and will wait for nature to do the rest.

The wind, waves and ocean currents are the next “engineers” in this innovative project that will see the transferred sand, all 20 million cubic metres (700 million cubic feet) of it, driven landward to form a natural barrier against the North Sea’s relentless onslaught…

Read Full Article, AFP / TerraDaily

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Zandmotor seen from the south, 21 july 2015. Photo source: Zandmotor

1895: The First Article On Beach Nourishment

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Beach re-nourishment, Goleta Beach, California, 2010. Photo source: ©SAF

Abstract: NS Shaler, Sea and Land, Features of coasts and oceans with special reference to the life of Man. London, p. 55-56, Smith, Elder and Co., 1895, 252 p.

Nathaniel Southgate Shaler, Powell’s Ally (1841–1906) a geographer, geologist, and dean of the Lawrence Scientific School at Harvard University, became, by the turn of the century, one of the most respected scholars in the country, in his specific field of scientific research.

In this retrieved article dated 1895, the author describes the transport of clasts by seaweed, makes footnote of sea wall and beach nourishment… most possibly a first.

“Sometimes these plants (seaweeds) attach themselves by their root-like bases-which are not in fact roots, for they serve only for support-to shells which lie prone or are fixed upon the bottom. More commonly they adhere to a pebble left on the sea-floor by the melting glacial sheet, or drifted out in the “pan-ice” which in winter forms along the sea margins. All these sea-weeds have floats which hold them upright in the water, and as they increase in size, they pull on their bases with constantly augmenting force. As the waves roll over them, they increase the tugging action, until finally, in some time of storm, the plant lifts lifts the stone from its bed and floats it in the water, buoyed up by the vesicles of air contained in its fronts. The plant and upturned stone are together borne in by the heave of the sea onto the shore. Coming into the breakers, the weed is quickly beaten to pieces, and the pebble enters the mill where so many of its fellows have met their fate. The close observer after a storm may find any number of these bowlders along a pebbly shore which still show traces of the sea-weeds which bore them to the coast…On a quarter of a mile of the Marblehead (MA) beach I have estimated that as much as ten tons of these seaweed-norne pebbles came ashore in a single storm. Many of the beaches which are so adequately provided with pebbles from the neighboring shores where the waves are attacking the firm land that they could not be maintained from that source alone, are sufficiently fed by the means of supply afforded by the action of marine plants. *”

* “On the parts of the shore where the land has been extensively occupied by summer residents, the owners have in many cases protected the coast from erosion by embankments and sea-walls, thus diminishing the amount of debris which was formerly contributed to the pocket beaches. In these artificial conditions the beaches often wear out, and the sea begins to assail the part of the coast which was once well protected. In such cases the only way in which the erosion can effectively be corrected is by carting each year to the beach a sufficient quantity of large bowlders to give employment to the waves and prevent their encroachment upon the shore. The larger these bowlders, the better; for if they are of small size they will be tossed about by slight storms and rapidly wear out, while masses weighing half a ton will be stirred only by the more tumultuous seas”.

The High Costs Of Beach Renourishment

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Separated from Anna Maria Island to the north by Longboat Pass, Longboat Key is a ten mile long barrier island located on the central west coast of the U.S. state of Florida. Caption USGS and Photo source: ©© fortinbras

Excerpts;

“The beach is in trouble once again,” said north end resident Gene Jaleski.

The sand at the newly renourished North Shore Road beach access is already eroding after its completion in May 2011, and an escarpment, or drop off, has formed at the beach access area.

Public Works Director Juan Florensa said he did not yet have any numbers reflecting the total sand lost, but that Public Works employees are surveying the area and will have some estimates by the end of November. Florensa also said that Public Works staff have posted ‘caution’ signs and tape so that beachgoers are aware of the sand drop-off and will be redirected to a safe path to the shoreline.

The north end interim beach renourishment project was completed in May 2011 at a cost of $4.5 million and placed 133,000 cubic yards of sand on the beach between just south of Broadway Street beach access to just north of the North Shore Road beach access…

Read Full Article, Longboat Key News

Ship Islands Restoration Underway

ship-islands-usa
Aerial view of Ship Island. Ship Island is the collective name for two barrier islands off the Gulf Coast of Mississippi, part of Gulf Islands National Seashore: East Ship Island and West Ship Island. Hurricane Camille split the once single island into 2 separate islands in 1969. West Ship Island is the site of Fort Massachusetts (built 1859-1866). (Wikipedia). Photo source: USGS

Excerpts;

A $300 million, 30-month project to build shoreline in an attempt to restore the storm-severed Ship Islands back into one island began this month as a torrent of up to 15,000 cubic yards of sand a day began pouring onto the north shore of West Ship Island…

Read Full Article, Dredging Today

Rejoining Ship Islands,

Officials Seek Public Comment On Beach Renourishment Project, California

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San Clemente beach, California. Photo source: ©© DB2

Excerpts;

Southern California residents have two weeks left to comment on the Army Corps of Engineers beach replenishment project.

The study runs 7.5 miles along the california shoreline of San Clemente, and the plan would add an initial 251,000 cubic yards of sand with more added every six years or about eight times over a 50-year period. The initial plan is budgeted for $11.1 million with the federal government paying $7.22 million. In 2011 dollars, the project will cost $84.9 million over the 50-year lifespan…

Read Full Article, Dredging Today

Southern California And Rising Sea: The Managed Retreat

Nags Heads Shoreline Losses A Lot Of Sand, And Money

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Photo source: ©© Shoreline

Excerpts;

Just weeks before the expected completion of a $36 million beach nourishment project, Hurricane Irene may have chewed away as much as 25 percent of the new sand pumped onto the Nags Head shoreline.

The storm, which left a noticeably smaller beach in its wake, has reignited the arguments of skeptics unconvinced that the controversial project was ever worth its price tag. Advocates, on the other hand, say the project performed just as it was intended.

The project is unprecedented on the Outer Banks, where shifting sands regularly expose oceanfront properties but federal funds have never been made available to nourish the beaches. Nags Head officials decided earlier this year to move ahead with the project despite widespread doubts about its longevity…

Read Full Article, Hampton Roads News

Florida Truncates Eco-Safeguards On Beach Projects

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Photograph: © SAF — Coastal Care

Excerpts;

Florida has suspended key protections to reduce or prevent environmental harm and public health risks in rebuilding eroded beaches with dredged materials, according to agency documents posted by Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER)…

Read Original Article, By Kirsten Stade, PEER

ENS Article

Read the Directive from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, April 15th 2011

Read Gov. Scott Comments on Beach Restoration, PEER

BP pledge to early restoration projects along Gulf Coast