Just Washed In

Rare emeralds discovered in 400-year-old shipwreck set to fetch millions

Inform
Mar
17

On April 25, the public will have the opportunity to own some of the most magnificent and valuable emeralds in the world, retrieved from the great Spanish shipwreck Nuestra Señora de Atocha, a galleon that sank off the Florida coast in 1622.

Calif. City Tries Shifting Sands Amid Disappearing Beaches

Today, with sea level rise and erosion threatening to eat away at the sandy expanses and damage city infrastructure, Santa Monica is testing a softer intervention. In a partnership with the nonprofit Bay Foundation, 3 acres of the beach’s north end have been seeded with native California dune plants.

Parts of Earth’s Original Crust Exist Today in Canada

News
Mar
17

Rocks from the eastern shore of the Hudson Bay in Canada contain elements of some of Earth’s earliest crust, new research finds. The rocks themselves are granites that are 2.7 billion years old, but they still hold the chemical signals of the precursor rocks that were melted and recycled to form the rocks that exist today.

Increase in extreme sea levels could endanger European coastal communities

Massive coastal flooding in northern Europe that now occurs once every century could happen every year if greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise, according to a new study.

A Threat by Any Other Name

According to research by the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication, 70 percent of Americans believed in March 2016 that global warming was happening. But on virtually every question about the causes, effects, and mitigation of climate change, we are widely divided along partisan lines. The word planners are using, more and more, is resilience. Once seen as a kind of stopgap strategy, resilience has become the modus operandi of climate planning.

Ship crashes into ‘pristine’ coral reef, captain may be charged

The captain of a cruise ship could be charged after his boat rammed into a pristine coral reef. The 297-foot (90.6 meter) MS Caledonian Sky crashed into the reefs at Raja Ampat on March 4. Raja Ampat is frequently included on lists of the the world’s most beautiful coral reefs and is often described as an “untouched” beach paradise.

Whanganui River the first in the world to be given legal status as a person, NZ

New Zealand’s Whanganui River now has the legal status of a person under a unique Treaty settlement passed into law today. It’s believed to be a world first.

War on global warming only way to save world’s coral, study says

Reducing pollution and curbing overfishing won’t prevent the severe bleaching that is killing coral at catastrophic rates, according to a study of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. In the end, researchers say, the only way to save the world’s coral from heat-induced bleaching is with a war on global warming.

Doctors join forces, warn climate change is harming our health

Climate change isn’t just happening in the Arctic Circle and Antarctica where more ice is melting year after year. Its impact is being felt right here at home, and it’s posing a threat to the health of millions of Americans, say doctors representing 11 top U.S. medical societies. They are joining forces in Washington, D.C., today to speak out about the health risks posed by climate change.

What is the Great Pacific Ocean Garbage Patch?

Inform, Pollution
Mar
15

Not all trash ends up at the dump. A river, sewer or beach can’t catch everything the rain washes away, either. In fact, Earth’s largest landfill isn’t on land at all. This marine debris has sloshed into the public spotlight lately, thanks to growing media coverage as well as expeditions by scientists and explorers hoping to see plastic pollution in action.

Coastal Care junior
The World's Beaches
Sand Mining
One Percent