Just Washed In

Bits of the Sahara on the Move

Inform
Apr
6

Scientists estimate that winds and storms pick up roughly 180 million tons of dust from the Sahara Desert each year and deposit it in the Atlantic Ocean and on the Americas. In the past week, active weather systems made a big deposit toward the 2018 total, as relentless storms lofted vast plumes of dust for days.

Like human societies, whales value culture and family ties

In a detailed genetic kinship study, an international team is the first to reveal that just like human societies, beluga whales appear to value culture and their ancestral roots and family ties.

Does new law restrict public access to Florida’s beaches?

News
Apr
6

A bill that Gov. Rick Scott signed into law last month has sent shock waves through Florida’s waterfront communities and prompted questions. The new law, which goes into effect July 1, has left some people afraid it will immediately cut off public access to beaches all over the state.

Philippines closes ‘cesspool’ tourist island of Boracay

The Philippines has announced a six-month closure of the popular tourist destination of Boracay over concerns the island’s famous beaches and clear blue waters have been transformed into a “cesspool” due to sustained environmental damage.

Seafloor erosion now occurring like coastal land loss

Erosion, News
Apr
4

Scientists have discovered that the seafloor from the Mississippi River Delta to the Gulf of Mexico is eroding like the land loss that is occurring on the Louisiana coast. During the 20th century, thousands of dams were built on Mississippi River tributaries stopping the flow of fine silt, clay and other sediment from reaching the delta and seafloor to offset erosion.

Connection of sea level and groundwater missing link in climate response

About 250 million years ago, when the Earth had no ice caps and the water around the equator was too hot for reptiles, sea level still rose and fell over time. Now, an international team of researchers has developed a way to track sea-level rise and fall and to tease out what caused the changes in the absence of ice sheets.

Human-Engineered Changes on Mississippi River Increased Extreme Floods

A new study has revealed for the first time the last 500-year flood history of the Mississippi River. It shows a dramatic rise in the size and frequency of extreme floods in the past century—mostly due to projects to straighten, channelize, and bound the river with artificial levees. It also uncovered a clear pattern over the centuries linking flooding on the Mississippi with natural fluctuations of Pacific and Atlantic Ocean water temperatures.

The Pearl, Qatar

The Pearl-Qatar, a man-made island spanning approximately 1.5 square kilometers (0.6 square miles), extends from the mainland, and once fully completed, The Pearl will create over 32 kilometers of new coastline.

Estuaries may experience accelerated impacts of human-caused CO2

Rising anthropogenic, or human-caused, carbon dioxide in the atmosphere may have up to twice the impact on coastal estuaries as it does in the oceans because the human-caused CO2 lowers the ecosystem’s ability to absorb natural fluctuations of the greenhouse gas, a new study suggests.

The Magic Dolphin; A Book By Charles O. Pilkey With Orrin H. Pilkey

A lighthearted, beautifully illustrated children’s book that tells the story of two kids who rescue a stranded dolphin, caught in a fish net. The grateful dolphin rewards the kids by taking them on an adventurous, world-encircling journey, teaching them along the way about global warming, sea level rise, beach erosion and other challenges facing the sea.

Coastal Care junior
The World's Beaches
Sand Mining
One Percent